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Old 02-22-2017, 10:10 PM
celine610 celine610 is offline
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Indonesia
Location: surabaya
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Hello! Nice to meet you all ! I'm Celine, and I'm a newbie in astronomy. I just found my interest in astronomy about 3 month ago. My aunt bought me a book about stars and constellations, and I found it really interesting. I was amazed to see how much stars and constellations the sky have. I really found it interesting, especially the part about Summer Triangle. I began to feel curious and search for more in books,internet,magazine,etc. That's where I learn that the stars in the Summer Triangle form (Altair, Vega, Deneb) are some of the brightest stars on the summer sky. I began to search for the classification of star, magnitude and luminosity.
Along with that, I also found Hertzsprung-Russel Diagram and classification of stars. That's my favorite topic of astronomy this far. I'm also quite interested with Nebula, Cluster, Supernova and Birth of Star and I'm still learning those topics now.
Well, my first experience of looking at the night sky, quite funny actually. I look at the sky about an hour after sunset (Nautical Twilight) and the first star to appear is a big,shiny star. I was about to think that it is a star with magnitude 1 or 2. After that, I search in the internet : 'The first star to appear in the evening sky' and all the search results show that the first star to appear is not actually star, it was Venus. After that, I immediately run upstairs (I watch the stars from my balcony at the 4th floor) and look at the star closely with binoculars. After I look closely, I realize it. It wasn't actually a star, it's Venus! (it actually looks like star, that's why it has the call name 'Evening Star', right? ) . So, that's my first experience o looking at the evening sky. It was really a cool experience
I hope I could improve my knowledge at astronomy by joining this community! And I also hoping for a lot of friends here! Nice to meet you all!. And, please give me some targets for beginner with binoculars,thanks!
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Old 02-23-2017, 09:28 AM
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DizzyGazer DizzyGazer is offline
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United States
Location: Skagit Valley, Washington - USA
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Hi Celine, and welcome to the site!

You're right about Venus...it can really shine at times.

One suggestion, if you haven't already downloaded it, as to download a program called Stellarium. It's an
awesome tool for astronomers, and will show you the night sky as seen from your location.

http://www.stellarium.org/

Do you have binoculars? If so, what strength are they?
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Old 02-23-2017, 07:08 PM
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Vinnie Vinnie is offline
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Australia
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Hi Celine and Welcome!

Can you get away from observing from a 4th floor balcony, like anywhere a bit away from what I am assuming to be a big city area with lots of light pollution?
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"If a straight line is the shortest distance between two points, a circle is the longest distance between the same point provided the circle is big enough" - Sellar and Yeatman
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Old 02-23-2017, 10:02 PM
celine610 celine610 is offline
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Indonesia
Location: surabaya
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinnie View Post
 Hi Celine and Welcome!

Can you get away from observing from a 4th floor balcony, like anywhere a bit away from what I am assuming to be a big city area with lots of light pollution?
Well, my house is located at the outskirts of the city, and people don't usually turn on a lot of lamps and lights on the night, so it's pretty clear to see the night sky from my balcony, but thanks for the advice anyway!
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Old 02-24-2017, 08:11 PM
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Vinnie Vinnie is offline
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Even so, just the heat retention from a building of multi floors will distort your view of the night sky. If there is a park close by that is a better option. But having said that your options are what they are and if it is from a balcony then so be it!

Binocular targets are a plenty. The Moon itself is an obvious one, things like M45 (The Pleiades) and other clusters, even M42 will show some nebulousness through a 50mm objective. M31 is observable showing a big faint cloud under good conditions. Saturn will be a distorted yellow ball, ie in Galileo's words it looked like it had "Ears" those bulges being the rings (of course Saturn isn't in the night sky for a few months yet)

I'm probably not the best advisor for binocular observing since I am blind in one eye, not much use for a binocular, hey (lol)! but I can say what I have seen through a really small telescope as in 40mm at 10x ~ 20x and a heck of a lot depends on clear dark sky.

Back in the day we used to advise that the perfect binocular for night sky was a 10x50 porro, (Porro is a type of prism) but my understanding these days is that the quality of glass is such that pretty much any binocular that isn't plastic is a good thing.

Do be aware, however, that if you have a binocular larger than 10x it is pretty much impossible to hold it steady for any period of time.

What binocular do you have?

Also do download Stellarium, as Mike has already suggested. It is a great aid
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Incurable Refractorholic. EQ6 GoTo, GP2 and EQ3 mounts. EPs: 2.5 & 4mm Vixen NLV. 5, 8, 13, 17 & 22mm Vixen LVW. 30 & 40mm Vixen NPL.


"If a straight line is the shortest distance between two points, a circle is the longest distance between the same point provided the circle is big enough" - Sellar and Yeatman
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