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Old 06-03-2016, 12:31 AM
mental4astro mental4astro is offline
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Default How do things look like through a telescope???

So, you are thinking something along these lines:

"I'm interested in getting a telescope, but I don't know what to get, or how things will appear through a telescope."


If you are a new comer to astronomy, much of the challenge is to know how things actually look like through a telescope in order to be able to identify them.

The purpose of this thread is to provide a reference point for how things appear through a variety of different telescope sizes typical as a 'first telescope'. This reference point is provided by sketches done by people sketching deep sky objects while at the eyepiece, producing images as they appear through the eyepiece, not as a photo taken by a camera.

This thread will give you an idea not only how different objects appear, but even the same object through different sized telescopes and under different sky conditions be it a city sky or somewhere where the only source of light is the stars in the sky.

This thread is also not limited to images made by experienced observers, but we welcome contributions by everyone who feels inspired to sketch things for them selves,

~x-X-x~

Omega Centauri through a 4" refractor at 17X magnification from a dark site. The low magnification is enough to show the giant globular cluster resolved, set upon the background glow of the Milky Way, and the surrounding dust and gas cloud that also criss-cross the Milky Way:





The Lagoon Nebula (M8), the Trifid Nebula (M20) and M21 all in the one field of view, from my backyard in Sydney with an 8" reflector. While not the best situation to view these fantastic objects, a light polluted sky does not mean that they can't be seen and wonderful details are also visible:





This is just the start of this thread. I'll post more of my own work here, and I hope to see other people's contributions too.

If you have any comments or any questions or any requests, please do ask! It's a big reason for why this thread has been started too,

Alex.

Last edited by Vinnie; 06-06-2016 at 02:20 AM.
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Old 06-03-2016, 09:57 AM
mental4astro mental4astro is offline
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Below is the Orion Nebula Nebula done using a 2" refractor from my home in Sydney. The piece shows M42, its little round companion M43, and the cluster-nebula system NGC 1977, The Running Man Nebula. Sorry about the quality of this photo. It was an early photo of my sketches, and one I should look at retaking. One thing to take note about the sketch is the tiny black nick that cuts up into the brightest section of the Orion Nebula. It is not a mistake. It is called the 'Fish Mouth' and is the easiest dark pillar in the sky to see. Dark pillars are columns of gas and dust that are hiding the proto-stars that are forming deep inside these dark structures. The bright stars that are illuminating the nebula are blowing away the gas and dust material that they were born out of. But these dark pillars of gas and dust are resisting the erosion of the solar wind blown out by the massive young stars that are making the nebula glow. For the gas and dust to be able to resist being eroded there must be something BIG inside them to have the necessary gravity to hold onto all this material. And it happens to be stars that are being formed but have not quite kicked off their nuclear fires! We can't see these proto-stars from Earth, but the Hubble Space Telescope has been able to see into this area as it can see in the infra-red spectrum. These proto-stars are actually very hot from the crush they are experiencing from their mass and size, and are on the verge of having their nuclear fires triggered. Pretty cool I reckon! And this dark pillar can be easily seen with a little 2" refractor from Sydney!



Eta Carina through to NGC 3532. Binoculars are the most underrated set of astronomical equipment that there is. While they may not have the aperture grunt of a much bigger telescope, because it is BOTH eyes working together, and that they are low magnification, they actually can show a wider field of view, but they can actually show some faint objects that are actually close to invisible in ANY sized scope!!!! Below is a sketch of the incredibly rich area of the Milky Way just to the west of the Southern Cross, showing the area between the giant nebula Eta Carina the huge open cluster NGC 3532 done using 11X70 binos. The area between these two individual objects is littered with dozens of smaller clusters & nebulae all over the background glow of the Milky Way. And this is a piece done from my home in Sydney! I can't wait to revisit this area, but from a dark sky site!


Last edited by Vinnie; 06-06-2016 at 02:19 AM.
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Old 06-05-2016, 02:49 PM
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Massoid Massoid is offline
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Hi Alex... are the underlined intros meant to be hyperlinked or reveal and image or something? Can't see anything... great to have this sketch section though.
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Old 06-05-2016, 05:51 PM
mental4astro mental4astro is offline
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Hi Steve,

Following your question, I've made the underlined headings links to the sketches on my album here in AHC. As for not seeing the pictures in the postings, I don't know why you are not. I see them on my machine,
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Old 06-05-2016, 06:12 PM
mental4astro mental4astro is offline
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♦Hi again, a couple more entries. Hopefully the quibbles on the images being seen or not is sorted soon.

Area around the Lagoon (M8), the Trifid (M20) & M21 again, this time with 11X70 binoculars. Like I said earlier, binos are the most underestimated piece of astro equipment. This area, when seen through a scope, zeros in too much on individual objects. What we can miss out on, not only because of the narrower field of view, but also certain technical specs of scopes, is the incredibly rich amount of detail that surrounds many, even most, deep sky objects. M8 & M20 sit on the northern edge of the Cloud of Sagittarius - the densest star field in the whole sky. The 'Cloud' lies in the direction of the core of the Milky Way galaxy, but the Cloud actually obscures the view of the galactic hub as it is part of one of the Milky Way's spiral arms that cuts in between us and the galactic hub. But what we see around M8 and M20 is an amazing array of details, from the extensive halos of nebulosity of the nebulae, to other smaller open clusters and dark nebulae that is made up of gas and dust that floats through the Milky Way. In fact, the MAJORITY of material that forms the bulk of ALL galaxies is not stars, but this very same unilluminated gas and dust. Stars actually form a very small percentage of a galaxy's mass.



Eta Carina nebula complex, seen through a 4" f/5 refractor at 17X. Another thing that we can do unwittingly with our scopes is use to much magnification, and zero in on just a small area of a much larger object. The Eta Carina nebula is one of these massive objects whose vast extensions are usually left out during an observation. This low magnification piece shows how vast the nebula is, and not just the central area around the star Eta Carina itself that lends its name to the whole nebula.



Last edited by Vinnie; 06-06-2016 at 02:19 AM.
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